Kind of Knife

Slicing Knife(Yangiba knife) 

Slicing Knife(Yangiba knife)

Yanagiba Jaoanese Chef knives is Sashimi knives that we offer at Chef Knives

Yanagiba Jaoanese Chef knives is Sashimi knives that we offer at Chef Knives. Yanagibas or Sashimi Knives are traditional style Japanese slicing knives that typically have a excellently face sharpened edge, meaning they are sharpened mostly on one side for a much sharper cutting edge. Sashimi knives are used primarily by Sushi chefs to thinly slice fish but the knife is increasingly popular with western cooks for a multitude of tasks including roast carving.

Deba Knife

Deba Knife

Deba Japanese knives are used in Japanese fish markets

Deba Japanese knives are  used in Japanese fish markets and restaurants to butcher and fillet whole fish without damaging the flesh. Although many use this knife on meat as well, the deba is not intended for chopping large diameter bones nor should it be used by slamming down the knife like a cleaver. For the best results, please apply pressure on the spine of the knife to make clean and precise cuts. Originated in Kansai (Osaka) region.

Gyuto Knife

Gyoto Japanese Knife

Gyoto Japanese Knife made by VG10 Steel 16th layers

The Gyuto Knife is a Japanese designed chef’s knife. Gyutos vary widely in design but generally range from 210 mm to 270 mm in length though smaller and larger examples can be found. Like the familiar western styled chef’s knife, Gyutos are commonly tall at the heel, have a reasonably flat profile toward the heel for chopping, a belly toward the tip of the blade for rock cutting, and a pointed tip for precision work. For most users a Gyuto is practically the only knife needed in the kitchen. While specialized knives may be easier to use in some applications, there are few chores that a gyuto cannot do in a pinch. Gyutos are the most diverse type of knives on Chef Knives to Go so users are spoiled for choice in shopping for one but there are several other types of knives that can be considered a complement or even a replacement for a Gyuto. Western styled chef’s knives, santokus, banno Bunkas, and funayukis are common alternatives to Gyutos while some users even use sujihikis or longer petty knives depending on their preferences and specific applications.

Sakimaru Knife 

Sakimaru Knife to  the octopus

The Sakimaru Japanese knife is a long slicing knife to cut the octopus

The Sakimaru Japanese knife is a long slicing knife that was designed to slice paper thin slices of fish for sashimi and its blunt sharp tip is useful for cutting the long tentacles of the octopus. The Sakimaru Japanese knife is longer and thinner than a Yanagi and can slice through an ingredient in long uninterrupted strokes, preserving the ingredients’s freshness and integrity.

Petty knife 

Petty knife is small utility knife of Japanese design and  can vary significantly in both profile and size

Petty knife is small utility knife of Japanese design and can vary significantly in both profile and size

Petty knife is small utility knife of Japanese design. Pettys can vary significantly in both profile and size, ranging from 75mm to 210mm. Petty knives are very similar to the common western paring or utility knife. While there is no hard rule about where a petty and paring knife diverge or what application each is most adept at, pettys are often considered ideal for small and delicate tasks on a cutting board while paring knives are better employed in hand. Anyone interested in a petty should also consider whether a paring or utility knife may also suit their needs.

Santoku Knife

 

Santoku Knife

Santoku Knife translate literally, to “Three Virtues.” It is used for slicing fish, meat, and vegetables.

Santoku translate literally, to “Three Virtues.” It is used for slicing fish, meat, and vegetables. Lightweight and multipurpose, the knife is popular for both home and professional use. The Santoku knife has been called an Asian chef’s knife in deference to its general utility at a variety of cutting tasks. The santoku has a straighter edge than a chef’s knife, with a blunted sheepsfoot-tip blade and a thinner spine, particularly near the point. The blade is from 27 cm to 36 cm long, a true Japanese santoku is well-balanced, normally flat-ground, and generally lighter and thinner than its Western counterparts, often using superior blade steels to provide a blade with exceptional hardness and an acute cutting angle. This construction allows the knife to more easily slice thin-boned and boneless meats, fish, and vegetables. Many subsequent Western and Asian copies of the Japanese santoku do not always incorporate these features, resulting in reduced cutting ability. Some Western santoku-pattern knives are even fitted with kullens, scallops on the sides of the blade above the edge, in an attempt to reduce the sticking of foods and reduce cutting friction. A standard in Asian (especially Japanese) kitchens, the santoku and its Western copies have become very popular in recent years with chefs in Europe and the United States.

Usuba Kamagata

Usuba Kamagata Knife

The Usuba Kamagata is a traditional Japanese style knife designed specifically to cut vegetables.

The Usuba Kamagata is a traditional Japanese style knife designed specifically to cut vegetables. Japanese cuisine stresses the importance and beauty of seasonal ingredients, referred to as `shun.’ The literal translation of usuba is `thin blade.’ Without this incredibly sharp and thin blade, the knife would break down the cell walls of vegetables, causing ingredients to discolor and decrease in flavor. Originated in Kanto (Tokyo) region. The The Usuba Kamagata is a traditional Japanese style knife designed specifically to cut vegetables. Japanese cuisine stresses the importance and beauty of seasonal ingredients, referred to as `shun.’ The literal translation of usuba is `thin blade.’ Without this incredibly sharp and thin blade, the knife would break down the cell walls of vegetables, causing ingredients to discolor and decrease in flavor. Originated in Kanto (Tokyo) region.
The Usuba Kamagata is a traditional Japanese knife designed to work with vegetables. Unlike the Kanto version of the usuba, the kamagata usuba has a pointed tip, which allows for more delicate work and decorative carving. Originated in Kansai (Osaka) region. is a traditional Japanese knife designed to work with vegetables. Unlike the Kanto version of the usuba, the kamagata usuba has a pointed tip, which allows for more delicate work and decorative carving. Originated in Kansai (Osaka) region. is a traditional Japanese style knife designed specifically to cut vegetables. Japanese cuisine stresses the importance and beauty of seasonal ingredients, referred to as `shun.’ The literal translation of usuba is `thin blade.’ Without this incredibly sharp and thin blade, the knife would break down the cell walls of vegetables, causing ingredients to discolor and decrease in flavor. Originated in Kanto (Tokyo) region. The kamagata usuba is a traditional Japanese knife designed to work with vegetables. Unlike the Kanto version of the usuba, the kamagata usuba has a pointed tip, which allows for more delicate work and decorative carving. Originated in Kansai (Osaka) region.